Book Review: Two Fates by Judy Balan

Today, in all new session of THE READING ROOM, we are going to review Two Fates – The Story of My Divorce by Judy Balan

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Book Description:

Two Fates

 

It’s a classic tale of Punjabi boy-meets-Tamilian girl. They fall in love, the families oppose it. But love conquers all and they get married to live happily ever after. Or do they? There’s a twist in this hilarious tale by Judy Balan when, four years down the line, Rishab and Deepika fall out of love. But if getting married was hard, getting divorced is much, much harder – because by now it’s their families who have fallen in love – with each other. And will leave no stone unturned to make sure that what the Fates have joined together, no couple shall put asunder, even if it mean staying together like one big, happy, inter-community family. Read this book to find out the flip side of a Two States marriage.

My View: Two Fates – The Story of my divorce by Judy Balan is a light-hearted story of a planned separation of a couple. This is not just another couple but it is one empowered and inspired by one of a recent successful bollywood flicks – Two States. Two states is a movie based on a novel, authored by successful author – Chetan Bhagat.

The story starts as we are introduced to a patient – Siddharth, who has decided to part ways with his spouse but visits this psychiatrist (the protagonist – Deepika), on demand from his family in order to save the drowning ship. He tries to convince her to write a report that separation is the best solution for his case, which she very cleverly tries to avert by negotiating with him to listen to her own story first. He gives in.

Her story is about – Rishab Khanna (her husband) and Deepika Sundar (she, herself). Rishab is a Punjabi munda (boy) belonging to a typical Punjabi family and a catty mom – a stereotypical Punjabi mother-in-law who smells what is cooking inside the bed room based on her analysis of the count of the folds in the bed sheets. Like any other Punjabi family, he too has a long, non-ending list of chit-chattering extended family and distant cousins who are just a call away. Diametrically opposite is Deepika Sundar and her south Indian family, who is not as loud as a ‘tagged’ Punjabi syndrome but has been blessed with a finicky aunt – Reshu Periamma, who can talk just about anything crossing the bedroom doors.

The couple after spending four years of blessed marriage decides to get separated. The auspicious time coincides with the heightened expectations of the family members to be blessed with a child. The story revolves around the tug-of-war between the struggling couple at one end and families (both) at the other hand, standing hand-in-hand. Initially, they stride along with the circumstances just to plan their separation and planning how to crack the deal but the things turn dramatic with introduction of new characters and a surprising nuptial knot being held in the family within a short notice.

Will they be able to plan their separation successfully? Will they ultimately separate?  How will they break news to family? How will the family react? How will they respond from bottlenecks from two states? What is in store for them in their two fates? And, will Siddharth get his report, as per his expectations? Why is she, after all interested in reciting her ‘emotional – saga’ at all? You will find your answers only after grabbing a copy for yourself.

Reasons why you should pick up one for you include an interesting story line, doing justice with its precursor – Chetan Bhagat’s, Two states, authors commendable effort to imbibe Punjabi culture into her nib, touch of sarcastic humour in every single line and a light hearted, enjoyable, interesting read. I do not have any reason to count why you should NOT pick this book up.

A recommended read. I thoroughly enjoyed reading the book, especially the Punjabi names and personas of mother-in-law(s). Adding to the flavours were their encounters with the family members, which ultimately used to hinder their planning the planning efforts – a Punjabi Tadka, indeed.

A justified sequel to two states movie. I would love to watch a movie based on this novel. Surprisingly, the story is inspired by author’s own real life. I simply loved reading this work from her and would like to read more from her. J

My Rating: 4/5

Title: Two Fates – The Story of My Divorce

Author: Judy Balan

ISBN 13: 978-93-81626-00-9

Genre: Fiction

Publisher: Westland

Buy this book online

So here, we come to an end to today’s session of Reading Room.

Reviewed By: Priyanka Batra Harjai (Team WordBite)

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